Underwater and on fire: US climate change magnifies extremes

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This combination of photos shows a firefighter at the North Complex Fire in Plumas National Forest, Calif., on Monday, Sept. 14, 2020, left, and a person using a flashlight on flooded streets in search of their vehicle, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, in Pensacola, Fla. In the past week, swaths of the country have been burning and flooding in devastating extreme weather disasters.

AP

America’s worsening climate change problem is as polarized as its politics. Some parts of the country have been burning this month while others were underwater in extreme weather disasters.

The already parched West is getting drier and suffering deadly wildfires because of it, while the much wetter East keeps getting drenched in mega-rainfall events, some hurricane related and others not. Climate change is magnifying both extremes, but it may not be the only factor, several scientists told The Associated Press.

“The story in

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Reports in the Sri Lankan media suggest that a misstep by the Sri Lankan Government could have cost the country up to $25 million following a major fire on the Panama-flagged oil supertanker, the MT New Diamond. This is all due to a little known quirk in an obscure shipping law. Sri Lanka’s Attorney General has since reached out for $2 million from the owners and insurers of the vessel on 16 September, an amount ten times less.

Several countries had been involved in the dramatic vessel rescue two weeks ago, where a fire raged for several days following an onboard boiler explosion on 3 September. Uncertainty continues as the heavily damaged vessel is towed to be inspected in

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Crew on Boat Where Fire Killed 34 in California Had No Emergency Training

Crew members on a dive boat say they were never instructed on emergency procedures before a predawn fire swept through the vessel as it was anchored off the Southern California coast, killing 34 people as they slept below deck, according to federal documents released this week.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators say the cause of the blaze aboard the Conception remains undetermined but a possible ignition point was phones and other electronics plugged into outlets. One crew member told investigators he saw sparks when he plugged in his cellphone hours before the fire.

The boat was carrying 33 passengers on a Labor Day weekend scuba diving expedition last year. The fire broke out on the final night as the Conception was anchored off Santa Cruz Island, about 25 miles south of Santa Barbara, the boat’s home port.

All of the passengers and one crew member sleeping below deck were killed,

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No Emergency Training for Crew on California Boat Where Fire Killed 34

In this Sept. 2, 2019, file photo provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, the dive boat Conception is engulfed in flames after a deadly fire broke out aboard the commercial scuba diving vessel off the Southern California Coast. Photo: Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP, File

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Crew members on a dive boat say they were never instructed on emergency procedures before a predawn fire swept through the vessel as it was anchored off the Southern California coast, killing 34 people as they slept below deck, according to federal documents released Wednesday.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators say the cause of the blaze aboard the Conception remains undetermined but a possible ignition point was phones and other electronics plugged into outlets. One crew member told investigators he saw sparks when he plugged in his cellphone hours before the fire.

The boat was carrying 33

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No emergency training for crew on California dive boat where fire killed 34

LOS ANGELES — Crew members on a dive boat say they were never instructed on emergency procedures before a predawn fire swept through the vessel as it was anchored off the Southern California coast, killing 34 people as they slept below deck, according to federal documents released Wednesday.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators say the cause of the blaze aboard the Conception remains undetermined but a possible ignition point was phones and other electronics plugged into outlets. One crew member told investigators he saw sparks when he plugged in his cellphone hours before the fire.

The boat was carrying 33 passengers on a Labor Day weekend scuba diving expedition last year. The fire broke out on the final night as the Conception was anchored off Santa Cruz Island, about 25 miles south of Santa Barbara, the boat’s home port.

All of the passengers and one crew member sleeping below deck

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No emergency training for crew on dive boat where fire killed 34 in California

LOS ANGELES — Crew members on a dive boat say they were never instructed on emergency procedures before a predawn fire swept through the vessel as it was anchored off the Southern California coast, killing 34 people as they slept below deck, according to federal documents released Wednesday.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators say the cause of the blaze aboard the Conception remains undetermined but a possible ignition point was phones and other electronics plugged into outlets. One crew member told investigators he saw sparks when he plugged in his cellphone hours before the fire.

The boat was carrying 33 passengers on a Labor Day weekend scuba diving expedition last year. The fire broke out on the final night as the Conception was anchored off Santa Cruz Island, about 25 miles south of Santa Barbara, the boat’s home port.

All of the passengers and one crew member sleeping below deck

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Crew on dive boat, where fire killed 34, had no emergency training: report

The crew on a dive boat that caught fire off the Southern California coast last year, killing 34, did not have emergency training, according to federal documents.



smoke coming out of the water: FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2019, file photo provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, firefighters respond to a fire aboard the Conception dive boat in the Santa Barbara Channel off the coast of Southern California. Coroner's reports for the 34 victims who died in the massive scuba boat fire off the Southern California coast last year show the divers died of carbon monoxide poisoning before they were burned, authorities said Thursday, May 21, 2020. (Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP, File)


© Provided by New York Daily News
FILE – In this Sept. 2, 2019, file photo provided by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department, firefighters respond to a fire aboard the Conception dive boat in the Santa Barbara Channel off the coast of Southern California. Coroner’s reports for the 34 victims who died in the massive scuba boat fire off the Southern California coast last year show the divers died of carbon monoxide poisoning before they were burned, authorities said Thursday, May 21, 2020. (Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP, File)

The crew of the Conception, which was carrying 33 passengers when the fire broke out on Sept. 2, claimed as much in the documents released Wednesday, The Associated Press reports.

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Crew members aboard dive boat that caught fire and left 34 dead say they didn’t know emergency procedures

Crew members of the Southern California dive boat that caught on fire and resulted in 34 deaths said they were not up to speed on emergency procedures when a fire broke out on the boat in 2019.



a train on a track with smoke coming out of the water


© Provided by Washington Examiner


Thirty-three passengers were on the boat during a Labor Day weekend scuba diving expedition in 2019 when a fire broke out and spread while passengers were sleeping. All the passengers and one crew member who were asleep below the deck were killed. Five other crew members barely escaped after unsuccessfully trying to save others.

Investigators said the cause of the fire is still unknown, but plugged-in phones and other electronics might have been a possible ignition point, according to CBS News.

Documents released on Wednesday by the National Transportation Safety Board provided more information regarding the boat’s final hours and will likely prompt criminal charges to be

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No emergency training held for crew on Conception dive boat where fire killed 34

Crew members on a dive boat say they were never instructed on emergency procedures before a predawn fire swept through the vessel as it was anchored off the Southern California coast, killing 34 people as they slept below deck, according to federal documents released Wednesday.

National Transportation Safety Board investigators say the cause of the blaze aboard the Conception remains undetermined but a possible ignition point was phones and other electronics plugged into outlets. One crew member told investigators he saw sparks when he plugged in his cellphone hours before the fire.

The boat was carrying 33 passengers on a Labor Day weekend scuba diving expedition last year. The fire broke out on the final night as the Conception was anchored off Santa Cruz Island, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Santa Barbara, the boat’s home port.

RELATED: All 34 victims of the deadly ‘Conception’ boat

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